Understanding Health Risks

 

 

 

Improve Your Chances for Good Health

“A health risk is the chance or likelihood that something will harm or otherwise affect your health risk.” People tend to understand that there are health risks around them all the time, but what they don’t understand is that there are things they can do to prevent or lessen the likelihood of health risks.

Health risk factors include: age, gender, family, health history, lifestyle and more. Health risks that are genetically or ethnically connected to a person are more difficult to avoid and/or improve. Other health risks can be improved through control over one’s diet, physical activity, and taking persuasions such as wearing a seatbelt while driving.

Dr. William Elmwood, a psychologist and behavioral scientist at NIH, says that, “Understanding health risks is key to making your own health care decisions.” This is true, the more you know and understand about your body and surrounding factors the better health choices you can make for yourself.  

Read more to further understand the importance of being able to recognize health risks and how to prevent them from happening as well as improve your chances of having good health: https://newsinhealth.nih.gov/issue/oct2016/feature1

 

 

 

 

 

More Physical Health...

 

 

 

Improve Your Chances for Good Health

“A health risk is the chance or likelihood that something will harm or otherwise affect your health risk.” People tend to understand that there are health risks around them all the time, but what they don’t understand is that there are things they can do to prevent or lessen the likelihood of health risks.

Health risk factors include: age, gender, family, health history, lifestyle and more. Health risks that are genetically or ethnically connected to a person are more difficult to avoid and/or improve. Other health risks can be improved through control over one’s diet, physical activity, and taking persuasions such as wearing a seatbelt while driving.

Dr. William Elmwood, a psychologist and behavioral scientist at NIH, says that, “Understanding health risks is key to making your own health care decisions.” This is true, the more you know and understand about your body and surrounding factors the better health choices you can make for yourself.  

Read more to further understand the importance of being able to recognize health risks and how to prevent them from happening as well as improve your chances of having good health: https://newsinhealth.nih.gov/issue/oct2016/feature1

 

 

 

 

 

Telltale signs of being past your prime, such as baldness and creased earlobes, may provide an early warning of heart disease, say scientists.

Researchers found that men and women who had three to four ageing signs were 57% more likely than younger looking individuals to suffer a heart attack. Their overall risk of heart disease was raised by 39%.

"The visible signs of ageing reflect physiologic or biological age, not chronological age, and are independent of chronological age," said lead scientist Professor Anne-Tybjaerg-Hansen, from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

Her team studied almost 11,000 men and women aged 40 years and older noting four key signs of ageing - receding hairline, crown top baldness, earlobe creases, and yellow fatty deposits around the eyes.

Over the next 35 years, 3,401 of the participants developed heart disease and 1,708 suffered a heart attack.

Both individually and together, the ageing signs predicted heart attack and heart disease independently of traditional risk factors.

Fatty deposits around the eyes were the strongest single predictor of both heart attack and heart disease.

The risk of heart disease and heart attack increased with each additional sign of ageing, the scientists told the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions meeting in Los Angeles.

People in their 70s and with multiple signs of ageing were most at risk.

"Checking these visible ageing signs should be a routine part of every doctor's physical examination," said Prof Tybjaerg-Hansen.

Original article: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/11/07/signs-of-ageing-signal-heart-disease_n_2087208.html

Asthma is a chronic condition in which the airways that carry air to the lungs are inflamed and narrowed.

Inflamed airways are very sensitive, and they tend to react to things in the environment called triggers, such as inhaled substances. When the airways react, they swell and narrow even more, and also produce extra mucus, all of which make it harder for air to flow to the lungs.

Asthma symptoms

When the airways react to asthma triggers, people can experience an asthma flare-up or asthma attack. Symptoms of an asthma attack include: coughing, chest tightness, wheezing and trouble breathing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Some people have mild asthma symptoms that go away on their own, or only experience asthma symptoms in response to certain activities like exercising. Other people have more serve and frequent symptoms.

What causes asthma?

The underlying cause of asthma is not known, but it's thought to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. People with asthma may have genetic risk factors that make them more susceptible to the disease, and certain environmental factors, such as exposure to allergens or certain viral infections in infancy, may increase the risk of developing the disease, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI).

Symptoms of asthma can be caused by triggers. Common asthma triggers include: tobacco smoke, dust mites, air pollution, pollen, mold, respiratory infections, physical activity, cold air and allergic reactions to some foods

Asthma treatment & medications

There is no cure for asthma. People who experience asthma symptoms should speak with their doctor about how to best treat and manage their condition.

Managing asthma usually involves avoiding asthma triggers, and taking medications to prevent or treat symptoms.

There are two types of medications to treat asthma: long-term medications and quick-relief medications.

Long-term medications are typically taken daily to help prevent asthma symptoms from starting in the first place. A common medication is inhaled corticosteroids, which reduce airway inflammation and make airways less sensitive. Other long-term medications include omalizumab, a shot given one or two times a month to prevent the body from reacting to asthma triggers, and Inhaled long-acting beta2-agonists, which help open airways.

Quick-relief medications provide relief from acute asthma symptoms. A common quick-relief medication is inhaled short-acting beta2-agonists, which help relax muscles around the airways, allowing more air to flow through them. People with asthma should have a quick-relief inhaler with them at all times to case they need it, according to the NHLBI.

Childhood asthma

Anyone can have asthma, but it most often starts in childhood. Of the 25 million asthma sufferers in the United States, 7 million are children, according to the NHLBI.

Most children with asthma develop it before age five, according to the American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). In children, asthma can appear as wheezing or whistling sound when breathing, coughing, rapid or labored breathing, complaints of chest pain and feeling weak or tired, AAAAI says

In children, asthma is the leading cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations and missed days of school, according to the Mayo Clinic. A child's asthma symptoms may continue into adulthood, the Mayo Clinic says.

By: Rachael Rettner

Orginal Article: http://www.livescience.com/41264-asthma-symptoms-treatment.html

Do you know the greatest threats to men's health? The list is surprisingly short. The top causes of death among adult men in the U.S. are heart disease, stroke, cancer and chronic lower respiratory disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The good news is that a few lifestyle changes can significantly lower your risk of these common killers.

Start by looking at your lifestyle

Take charge of your health by making healthier lifestyle choices. For example:

  • Don't smoke. If you smoke or use other tobacco products, ask your doctor to help you quit. It's also important to avoid exposure to secondhand smoke, air pollution and exposure to chemicals (such as in the workplace).
  • Eat a healthy diet. Choose vegetables, fruits, whole grains, high-fiber foods and lean sources of protein, such as fish. Limit foods high in saturated fat and sodium.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Losing excess pounds — and keeping them off — can lower your risk of heart disease as well as various types of cancer.
  • Get moving. Include physical activity in your daily routine. You know exercise can help you control your weight and lower your risk of heart disease and stroke. But did you know that it may also lower your risk of certain types of cancer? Choose sports or other activities you enjoy, from basketball to brisk walking.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. For men, that means up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger and one drink a day for men older than age 65. The risk of various types of cancer, such as liver cancer, appears to increase with the amount of alcohol you drink and the length of time you've been drinking regularly. Too much alcohol can also raise your blood pressure.
  • Manage stress. If you feel constantly on edge or under assault, your lifestyle habits may suffer — and so might your immune system. Take steps to reduce stress — or learn to deal with stress in healthy ways.

Stop avoiding the doctor

Don't wait to visit the doctor until something is seriously wrong. Your doctor can be your best ally for preventing health problems. Be sure to follow your doctor's treatment recommendations if you have health issues, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure or diabetes. Also, be sure to ask your doctor about when you should have cancer screenings and other health evaluations.

What else puts you at risk?

Another common cause of death among men are motor vehicle accidents. To stay safe on the road, use common sense. Wear your seat belt. Follow the speed limit. Don't drive under the influence of alcohol or any other substances, and don't drive while sleepy.

Suicide is another leading men's health risk. An important risk factor for suicide among men is depression. If you have signs and symptoms of depression — such as feelings of sadness or unhappiness and loss of interest in normal activities — consult your doctor. Treatment is available. If you're contemplating suicide, call for emergency medical help or go the nearest emergency room.

The bottom line

Understanding health risks is one thing. Taking action to reduce your risks is another. Start with healthy lifestyle choices — eating a healthy diet, staying physically active, quitting smoking and getting recommended health screenings. The impact may be greater than you'll ever know.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Orginal Article: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mens-health/MC00013