World Immunization Week: CDC Working 24/7 Worldwide

Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a disease that could be prevented with a safe and effective vaccine. Millions more children survive, but are left severely disabled. Vaccines have the power not only to save, but also transform lives by protecting against disease – giving children a chance to grow up healthy, go to school, and improve their lives.  Vaccination campaigns sometimes provide the only contact with health care services that children receive in their early years of life.

Immunization is one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions—it currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year in all age groups from diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), and measles.

Immunization is a global health priority at CDC focusing on polio eradication, reducing measles deaths, and strengthening immunization systems. CDC works closely with a wide variety of partners in more than 60 countries to vaccinate children and provide technical assistance to ministries of health to strengthen and expand countries’ abilities to create, carry out, and evaluate their national immunization programs.

Too few people realize that the health of Americans and the health of people around the world are inextricably linked. Viruses don’t respect borders, so they travel easily within countries and across continents. By helping to stop vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) globally, CDC is also helping to protect people in the United States against importations of VPDs from other countries.

For example, in 2011, there were 220 reported cases of measles in the United States—200 of the 220 cases were brought into the U.S. from other countries with measles outbreaks.

The most effective and least expensive way to protect Americans from diseases and other health threats that begin overseas is to stop them before they spread to our shores. CDC works 24/7 to protect the American people from disease both in the United States and overseas. CDC has dedicated and caring experts in over 60 countries. They detect and control outbreaks at their source, saving lives and reducing healthcare costs. In 2012, CDC responded to over 200 outbreaks around the world, preventing disease spread to the U.S.

CDC's global health activities protect Americans at home and save lives abroad. They reduce the need for U.S. assistance and create goodwill and good relationships with global neighbors.

By: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Original Article: http://www.cdc.gov/media/storyideas/

More Physical Health...

Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a disease that could be prevented with a safe and effective vaccine. Millions more children survive, but are left severely disabled. Vaccines have the power not only to save, but also transform lives by protecting against disease – giving children a chance to grow up healthy, go to school, and improve their lives.  Vaccination campaigns sometimes provide the only contact with health care services that children receive in their early years of life.

Immunization is one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions—it currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year in all age groups from diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), and measles.

Immunization is a global health priority at CDC focusing on polio eradication, reducing measles deaths, and strengthening immunization systems. CDC works closely with a wide variety of partners in more than 60 countries to vaccinate children and provide technical assistance to ministries of health to strengthen and expand countries’ abilities to create, carry out, and evaluate their national immunization programs.

Too few people realize that the health of Americans and the health of people around the world are inextricably linked. Viruses don’t respect borders, so they travel easily within countries and across continents. By helping to stop vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) globally, CDC is also helping to protect people in the United States against importations of VPDs from other countries.

For example, in 2011, there were 220 reported cases of measles in the United States—200 of the 220 cases were brought into the U.S. from other countries with measles outbreaks.

The most effective and least expensive way to protect Americans from diseases and other health threats that begin overseas is to stop them before they spread to our shores. CDC works 24/7 to protect the American people from disease both in the United States and overseas. CDC has dedicated and caring experts in over 60 countries. They detect and control outbreaks at their source, saving lives and reducing healthcare costs. In 2012, CDC responded to over 200 outbreaks around the world, preventing disease spread to the U.S.

CDC's global health activities protect Americans at home and save lives abroad. They reduce the need for U.S. assistance and create goodwill and good relationships with global neighbors.

By: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Original Article: http://www.cdc.gov/media/storyideas/

Health and wellness tips for your work, home and life—brought to you by the insurance specialists at HUB International Midwest

Winter

The winter months often provide some relief for allergy sufferers, as the outdoor air is cool and free of pollen. However, if you have allergies, you need to make sure that the air inside your house is clean as well. Be sure to:

·   Keep firewood outside.

·   Clean heating ducts and air conditioning filters.

·   Bathe house pets regularly if dander is a problem.

·   Keep your face covered when out in the cold. Going from cold outside air to warm indoor air can trigger asthma.

Spring

Mold growth blooms indoors and outdoors with spring rains. As flowers, trees, weeds and grasses begin to blossom, allergies will follow. Spring-cleaning activities can stir up dust mites, so be sure to:

·   Wash your bedding every week in hot water to help keep pollen under control.

·   Wash your hair before going to bed, since pollen can accumulate in your hair.

·   Wear an inexpensive painter’s mask and gloves when cleaning, vacuuming or painting to limit dust and chemical inhalation, and skin exposure.

·   Vacuum twice a week.

·   Limit the number of throw rugs in your home to reduce dust and mold.

·   Make sure the rugs you do have are washable.

·   Change air conditioning and heating air filters often.

Summer

Warm temperatures and high humidity can put a strain on seasonal allergy and asthma sufferers. Summer is the peak time for some types of pollen, smog and even mold:

·   Stay indoors between 5 a.m. and 10 a.m., when outdoor pollen counts tend to be highest.

·   Be careful when going from extreme outdoor heat to air conditioning. The temperature change can trigger an asthma attack.

·   Wear a mask when you mow the lawn or when around freshly-cut grass. Afterward, take a shower, wash your hair and change clothes.

·   Dry laundry inside instead of on an outside clothesline.

·   Check your yard for allergens, as well as other irritants such as oak, birch, cedar and cottonwood trees; weeds such as nettle or ragweed can also trigger allergies.

·   Wear shoes, long pants and long sleeves if allergic to bee stings.

·   Do not wear scented deodorants, hair products or perfumes when outdoors.

Fall

Cooler temperatures are ideal for planting flowers and trees, but be sure to plant those that produce less pollen, such as fir, pine, dogwood, azaleas, tulips, irises and pansies.

·   Wear a mask while raking leaves or when working with mulch or hay.

·   Use a dehumidifier in your basement to deter mold.

·   Clean your dehumidifier frequently.

·  Wash bathroom tiles and shower curtains with mold-killing products.

Did You Know...?

Back-to-school time is a great time to discuss allergies or asthma with your child’s school nurse and teachers. Inform them of your child’s needs, including any inhalers or medications, and what to do in case of an emergency.

By: Hub International

The first few days of a new workout routine can be magical, but much like a thriving relationship, an exercise regimen requires attention and creativity to maintain its allure. True, any exercise is better than no exercise, but who wants to always hit up the same ol’ treadmill?

Remember, the healthier you are overall, the better chance you have of avoiding eye conditions like hypertension and glaucoma, which often result from larger health issues. Mix up your workouts to help avoid gym boredom, and give these 5 activities a shot!

Roll with the punches

We’re all about the “no hitting” policy, but that doesn’t mean we can’t channel our frustrations into a punching bag every now and then. It’s a great way to improve agility, balance, circulation, and general fitness. With proper precautions and protection, you can enjoy a stress-relieving, heart-healthy workout.

Get your yoga on

Throw a twist into your yoga routine by trying aerial yoga, Cy-Yo (cycling and yoga combined), or floating yoga on a paddleboard if you’re feeling particularly adventurous. Even small scale changes, such as moving your routine to the backyard or a different room in your house, can be invigorating and help you avoid the workout doldrums.

Bounce around

If you just so happen to have a trampoline hanging around, put it to good use and get jumping! If not, scope out the alternative workout scene in your neighborhood for a trampoline dodge-ball or cardio class. While an excuse to burn calories and improve muscle tone is reason enough to get jumping, the fun factor is also a plus.

Cross train it up

This approach is especially good for those who enjoy structured and compact workouts. Push your normal workout boundaries by letting your instructor guide you and your classmates from squats, to sprints, to weights, to whatever he chooses. Be forewarned: you’re in for some sore muscles the next day!

Swirl the pounds away

Hula hoops are no longer just for kids, although you can use the little ones as an excuse to squeeze in a wacky workout. Grab a weighted hula hoop for extra resistance and fat-burning power, and get swirling. The best part about this activity is you don’t have to leave your house (or your TV!).

The content of this article is for general informational awareness purposes only. Please consult your eyecare doctor or physician for actual advice.
 
By: Envision
 
Original Article: http://www.vspenvisionnewsletter.com/2013/03/5-ways-to-avoid-workout-burnout/
 

 

Is your new year’s resolution not working out the way you planned? Don’t get down on yourself! More than likely you set a goal that might be too big to reach right away. Don’t fret!

At Access Health, we have the tools and steps that you need to start working towards these bigger goals. There is one key to make this possible… small changes! Step by step you can develop the tools you need to make real changes.

When it comes to getting to your healthy weight, start a fun exercise program to keep you motivated. It always helps to have a goal in mind! Whether it be to manage a health condition, improve stamina, or reduce stress. Once you start an exercise program you will see improvements in sleep, fitness, confidence, and better control of appetite.

You can start by small steps:

  • Take a 10-minute walk just twice a week
  • Find an exercise that works for you: dance, yoga, or karate
  • Talk to your health care provider if you have any past health issues
  • Take the stairs at work instead of the elevator
  • Add a walk into your lunch time
  • Park far from the store while running errands
  • Move around with everyday house chores

Once you start making the small changes then…

  • Aim to exercise around 2.5 hours a week
  • Exercise does not need to happen all at once
  • Break it up into shorter time periods during the day

So don’t give up on that new year’s resolution, just make the small changes to lead to lasting results!

Learn more about steps to have a healthier life, and visit the http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/specialtopic/physical-activity/overview.html