Triglyceride-Friendly Meals

Fries or fruit? Ribeye or tuna steak? Soda or water?

Every time you decide what to eat, you either increase or decrease your chance of having a heart attack or stroke. Let that inspire you to choose triglyceride-friendly meals.

“Changing the diet can have dramatic effects on triglyceride levels,” says Robert Bonow, MD, former president of the American Heart Association and professor of Medicine at Northwestern University. In fact, a healthy diet -- plus exercise and weight loss if you’re overweight -- can cut your triglyceride levels by 20% to 50%.

The meals below can help lower your triglycerides. You may need to adjust portion sizes to meet your calorie level.

Breakfasts That Protect Your Heart

Start the day off with healthy decisions. Choose one of these delicious breakfasts.   

Cereal & Berry Bowl

1 cup 1% or skim milk

1/2 cup oatmeal with 1-2 Tbsp of chopped walnuts

Or 1 serving of cold cereal, with 5 or more grams of fiber and 8 or less grams of sugar

1 cup raspberries, strawberries, or blueberries on top

Egg Sandwich

1 whole egg, 2 egg whites, or 1/4 cup egg substitutes

1 cup or more of diced tomatoes, spinach leaves, minced onion, and mushrooms

1 tsp trans-fat-free margarine or a small amount of olive oil

2 slices whole wheat toast

1 orange in sections or 1/4 cantaloupe on the side         

Yogurt Parfait

1 cup low-fat or nonfat yogurt

1 cup high-fiber cereal

1 sliced banana, 1 cup mango, or 1 peach

A small handful of almonds on top

Salmon Bagel

1 whole-grain bagel

1 oz sliced smoked salmon

1 Tbsp low-fat or nonfat cream cheese

Capers or fresh dill

1 cup melon cubes with any type of berry on the side

Lunches to Reduce Your Risk of Heart Attack

Here are some flavorful lunches you can pack, and a few you may even be able to buy.

Soup & Salad

1 cup vegetable, black bean, or lentil soup (or any low-fat or vegetarian soup)

5 whole-wheat crackers

2 cups salad made with dark greens, like spinach, mixed greens, or radicchio

1 cup of any combo of colorful, chopped veggies: broccoli, carrots, red bell peppers, sugar snap peas, snow peas, tomatoes

1 cup fruits: apples, grapes, kumquats, pears

1 Tbsp salad dressing made with olive oil or canola oil (or nonfat dressings)

Sandwich With Double Crunch

2 slices whole-wheat bread or 1 hamburger bun

2 oz tuna

1 Tbsp low-fat mayonnaise

Minced onion

Dill pickle relish or sugar-free sweet pickle relish

Top with thin slices of apple or pear for crunch (1 medium piece of fruit)

Add this crunchy side: 

Finger Salad

1 cup veggies like baby carrots, grape tomatoes, and red pepper strips mixed with fruit such as apple, grapes, or pear (with peel)

Chinese Delight

1 cup veggie stir-fry with 2 oz shrimp, chicken, or tofu (request olive or vegetable oil)

1/2 cup whole-wheat pasta or rice (brown or wild)

1 cup pineapple chunks

A Friendlier “Burger”

2 oz grilled chicken breast on whole-grain sandwich (with 1 Tbsp low-fat or nonfat mayo)

1 cup side salad

1 piece of fresh fruit

Keep it simple at night to make choices easy to follow.

Chicken Dinner

3 oz skinless grilled or broiled chicken (breast or dark meat)

1 baked sweet potato, served with 1 tsp trans-fat-free margarine

1 cup steamed broccoli with red pepper rings

1/2 cup light ice cream, frozen yogurt, low-fat or nonfat pudding, with 1 tsp chopped pistachios

Pasta Night

1 cup whole-wheat pasta or spaghetti squash

1 can of Italian diced tomatoes

1 cup or more of sauteed zucchini, yellow squash, mushrooms, peppers, or onions – veggies you like best

Add 3.5 oz. ground turkey breast, tofu, or crumbled meat substitute

Add basil, oregano, or rosemary, whichever flavor you prefer that night

1 Tbsp Parmesan cheese, dry grated, reduced fat

Wine: 1 glass for women, 2 for men (Skip the alcohol if your triglycerides are over 200 mg/dL)

Easy Fish

4 oz grilled or sauteed salmon or tuna steaks

Or grilled or broiled shrimp kabobs

1 tsp olive oil

1 cup steamed asparagus with lemon juice or balsamic vinegar

1/2 cup wheat couscous with mushroom broth and sliced scallions

1 cup roasted tomatoes

Vegetarian Night for Meat Lovers

1 (8 inch) corn tortillas

1/3 cup refried beans (fat-free or vegetarian)

2 Tbsp salsa

1 oz low-fat or fat-free Mexican cheese

1/2 cup slices of avocado

2 oz crumbled veggie sausage or meat substitute

Beer: 1 glass for women, 2 for men (no alcohol if your triglycerides are over 200 mg/dL)

Putting Together Your Own Meals

Fit in with your favorite meals by following these basics to lower your triglycerides.

  • Plan for a “moderate” amount of whole-grain carbohydrates. Use portion sizes on packages as a guide. Another way to estimate a healthy amount is to visually divide your plate into 4 equal parts. Fill half of it with fruits and vegetables, and fill a quarter of it with a whole grain. Fill the last quarter with a low-fat protein.
  • Limit “white” carbs and sugars. Keep foods made with white flour, desserts, candy, juices, and fruit drinks to a minimum.
  • Serve healthy fats because they can help lower your triglyceride levels. They are the unsaturated fats, especially omega-3s found in fatty fish, flaxseed, canola oil, and walnuts.
  • Don’t keep around tempting, unhealthy fats -- saturated fats found in red meat and baked goods and trans fats found in some packaged foods. If a food label says hydrogenated oil, don’t even open the bag.
  • Choose low-fat proteins, including chicken, fish, seafood, lean meats, and tofu.
  • Pour low or nonfat milk and choose low or nonfat dairy -- yogurt, cottage cheese, and cheese.
  • Limit how much alcohol you have each day. That’s 1 drink if you’re female and 2 if you are male. But even a small amount of alcohol may raise triglycerides in some people, so ask your doctor what’s right for you.

Having trouble adapting to low-triglyceride meals? See your doctor or a dietitian for help. Together you can put together a healthy meal plan that will lower your triglyceride levels and help you lose weight if you need to.

WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on November 12, 2012

More Nutritional Health...

Fries or fruit? Ribeye or tuna steak? Soda or water?

Every time you decide what to eat, you either increase or decrease your chance of having a heart attack or stroke. Let that inspire you to choose triglyceride-friendly meals.

“Changing the diet can have dramatic effects on triglyceride levels,” says Robert Bonow, MD, former president of the American Heart Association and professor of Medicine at Northwestern University. In fact, a healthy diet -- plus exercise and weight loss if you’re overweight -- can cut your triglyceride levels by 20% to 50%.

The meals below can help lower your triglycerides. You may need to adjust portion sizes to meet your calorie level.

Breakfasts That Protect Your Heart

Start the day off with healthy decisions. Choose one of these delicious breakfasts.   

Cereal & Berry Bowl

1 cup 1% or skim milk

1/2 cup oatmeal with 1-2 Tbsp of chopped walnuts

Or 1 serving of cold cereal, with 5 or more grams of fiber and 8 or less grams of sugar

1 cup raspberries, strawberries, or blueberries on top

Egg Sandwich

1 whole egg, 2 egg whites, or 1/4 cup egg substitutes

1 cup or more of diced tomatoes, spinach leaves, minced onion, and mushrooms

1 tsp trans-fat-free margarine or a small amount of olive oil

2 slices whole wheat toast

1 orange in sections or 1/4 cantaloupe on the side         

Yogurt Parfait

1 cup low-fat or nonfat yogurt

1 cup high-fiber cereal

1 sliced banana, 1 cup mango, or 1 peach

A small handful of almonds on top

Salmon Bagel

1 whole-grain bagel

1 oz sliced smoked salmon

1 Tbsp low-fat or nonfat cream cheese

Capers or fresh dill

1 cup melon cubes with any type of berry on the side

Lunches to Reduce Your Risk of Heart Attack

Here are some flavorful lunches you can pack, and a few you may even be able to buy.

Soup & Salad

1 cup vegetable, black bean, or lentil soup (or any low-fat or vegetarian soup)

5 whole-wheat crackers

2 cups salad made with dark greens, like spinach, mixed greens, or radicchio

1 cup of any combo of colorful, chopped veggies: broccoli, carrots, red bell peppers, sugar snap peas, snow peas, tomatoes

1 cup fruits: apples, grapes, kumquats, pears

1 Tbsp salad dressing made with olive oil or canola oil (or nonfat dressings)

Sandwich With Double Crunch

2 slices whole-wheat bread or 1 hamburger bun

2 oz tuna

1 Tbsp low-fat mayonnaise

Minced onion

Dill pickle relish or sugar-free sweet pickle relish

Top with thin slices of apple or pear for crunch (1 medium piece of fruit)

Add this crunchy side: 

Finger Salad

1 cup veggies like baby carrots, grape tomatoes, and red pepper strips mixed with fruit such as apple, grapes, or pear (with peel)

Chinese Delight

1 cup veggie stir-fry with 2 oz shrimp, chicken, or tofu (request olive or vegetable oil)

1/2 cup whole-wheat pasta or rice (brown or wild)

1 cup pineapple chunks

A Friendlier “Burger”

2 oz grilled chicken breast on whole-grain sandwich (with 1 Tbsp low-fat or nonfat mayo)

1 cup side salad

1 piece of fresh fruit

Keep it simple at night to make choices easy to follow.

Chicken Dinner

3 oz skinless grilled or broiled chicken (breast or dark meat)

1 baked sweet potato, served with 1 tsp trans-fat-free margarine

1 cup steamed broccoli with red pepper rings

1/2 cup light ice cream, frozen yogurt, low-fat or nonfat pudding, with 1 tsp chopped pistachios

Pasta Night

1 cup whole-wheat pasta or spaghetti squash

1 can of Italian diced tomatoes

1 cup or more of sauteed zucchini, yellow squash, mushrooms, peppers, or onions – veggies you like best

Add 3.5 oz. ground turkey breast, tofu, or crumbled meat substitute

Add basil, oregano, or rosemary, whichever flavor you prefer that night

1 Tbsp Parmesan cheese, dry grated, reduced fat

Wine: 1 glass for women, 2 for men (Skip the alcohol if your triglycerides are over 200 mg/dL)

Easy Fish

4 oz grilled or sauteed salmon or tuna steaks

Or grilled or broiled shrimp kabobs

1 tsp olive oil

1 cup steamed asparagus with lemon juice or balsamic vinegar

1/2 cup wheat couscous with mushroom broth and sliced scallions

1 cup roasted tomatoes

Vegetarian Night for Meat Lovers

1 (8 inch) corn tortillas

1/3 cup refried beans (fat-free or vegetarian)

2 Tbsp salsa

1 oz low-fat or fat-free Mexican cheese

1/2 cup slices of avocado

2 oz crumbled veggie sausage or meat substitute

Beer: 1 glass for women, 2 for men (no alcohol if your triglycerides are over 200 mg/dL)

Putting Together Your Own Meals

Fit in with your favorite meals by following these basics to lower your triglycerides.

  • Plan for a “moderate” amount of whole-grain carbohydrates. Use portion sizes on packages as a guide. Another way to estimate a healthy amount is to visually divide your plate into 4 equal parts. Fill half of it with fruits and vegetables, and fill a quarter of it with a whole grain. Fill the last quarter with a low-fat protein.
  • Limit “white” carbs and sugars. Keep foods made with white flour, desserts, candy, juices, and fruit drinks to a minimum.
  • Serve healthy fats because they can help lower your triglyceride levels. They are the unsaturated fats, especially omega-3s found in fatty fish, flaxseed, canola oil, and walnuts.
  • Don’t keep around tempting, unhealthy fats -- saturated fats found in red meat and baked goods and trans fats found in some packaged foods. If a food label says hydrogenated oil, don’t even open the bag.
  • Choose low-fat proteins, including chicken, fish, seafood, lean meats, and tofu.
  • Pour low or nonfat milk and choose low or nonfat dairy -- yogurt, cottage cheese, and cheese.
  • Limit how much alcohol you have each day. That’s 1 drink if you’re female and 2 if you are male. But even a small amount of alcohol may raise triglycerides in some people, so ask your doctor what’s right for you.

Having trouble adapting to low-triglyceride meals? See your doctor or a dietitian for help. Together you can put together a healthy meal plan that will lower your triglyceride levels and help you lose weight if you need to.

WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on November 12, 2012

In today’s day and age it is extremely important that you focus on ways to maintain a safe and healthy lifestyle and diet. The first step in this process is simple: don’t get caught up in diet fads. As fads come and go, it is important to guarantee that you’re adding easy components to your diet that will keep you healthy and fit.

Always make sure to keep your diet packed with a variety of foods: fruits, vegetables, dairy products, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats (such as avocados, nuts, fatty fish, and flaxseed). All of these components together can help you stay balanced.

Try to buy food that is grown locally within your community, and to always stay within the means of your lifestyle and budget. The purpose of maintaining a healthy diet is to work within the limits of your current lifestyle. This is the best possible way to ensure the endurance and overall success for the rest of your life.

For more information please check out this link: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/basics/healthy-diets/hlv-20049477

 

Ever wonder if artificial sweeteners are not helping you lose weight, but instead making you gain weight?

A study from New York Times, shows results from following a group of diverse Americans ages 45 to 84 for five years. The study found that those that drank diet soda at least once a day are 67% more likely at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

They are also at a 37% greater risk of metabolic syndrome, which can cause stroke, heart disease and diabetes.

Another study done in San Antonio over 10 years, found that those who drank diet drinks were twice as likely to become at risk for obesity or becoming overweight.

To learn more about the possible risks of artificial sweeteners, visit http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/19/artificial-sweeteners-and-weight-gain/?ref=health.

 

Take the thinking out of meal prep, suggests trainer Brett Hoebel: Find a few fast, healthy recipes for each meal of the day and keep the ingredients on hand.

It's time to put up or shut up. But that doesn't mean you have to go for broke eating healthy. The myth that eating healthy is too costly is just that: a myth. Here's the truth behind the lies about healthy eating and what it will cost you.

When it comes to eating healthy, decision is the ultimate power. Make the decision to lead a healthy lifestyle and become powerful instead of powerless.

The Money

I can't tell you how many times I've heard people say, "fast food is the cheapest option in my neighborhood," or "I really can't afford to eat healthy right now." The fact is a $2 bag of brown rice, $15 package of chicken and $10 in bulk veggies can feed a family of four for an entire week! This option costs much less than a $4 fast food meal each weeknight (if you can find a fast food meal that cheap these days).

Get real. There are far too many programs, web apps and meal plans that will literally show you how to eat healthy on a budget, so don't knock it until you actually try it!

The Time

"I don't have time," you say? Please … do I really have to list all the screen time on the Internet we use up doing absolutely nothing for our health? Not mention our drive time and leisure time going to waste.

Incorporate planning for meals into your daily routine, and multi-task when you can. Cooking takes up valuable time, so if you are working hard throughout the week, I suggest preparing meals in bulk on a day off, and keeping a go-to list of quick recipes for breakfast, lunch or dinner so you can make healthy meals on the go.

The Taste

"These vegetables are bland," It continues to shock me how many people dislike whole foods and exchange them for processed ones. But guess what all of the processed foods try to mimic? The taste of whole foods.

 

Skittles are fruit-flavored, but a natural kiwi, mango, and peach are so tasty without any additives. Tossed vegetables with herbs and olive oil are divine, but we give them up for bland-tasting fried potatoes drenched in ketchup – talk about bland.

Don't believe the hype: Healthy food IS tasty, and unhealthy food is some of the most bland stuff on the planet. That's why the ample amounts of salt, sugar and other additives have to be added to processed foods – they don't have any flavor! So don't get fooled. Taste can be altered. Just take the time to find the best recipes for healthy foods that meet your taste expectations.

Grocery Shopping Tips

• Avoid the white devils – white sugar, white milk, white rice, white salt and white flour.

• Focus on lean, healthy protein like chicken or fish, loads of fruits, veggies and nuts and a huge helping of H2O!

• Stick to brown or wild rice if necessary, and choose almond milk over dairy when you can.

• Use unprocessed, Himalayan salt and a healthy dose of fresh herbs and spices for seasoning.

• Purchase healthy fats like coconut oil, egg and avocado.

The Steps to Eating Healthy at All Costs

1. Skip the four-syllable ingredients: If you can't imagine your breakfast bar growing out of the ground, falling off of a tree or running around in the wild, it probably isn't a whole food! A nutrition label with ingredients you can't pronounce is a processed mess you should avoid. My rule of thumb: three ingredients or less, period.

2. Stay away from packages: A general rule of thumb is the more packaging, the more processed. If you can pick up the piece of produce or have the butcher pass you the meat, you are in good shape. Frozen, dried, canned, bagged or boxed food is usually not whole food. Be very wary of terminology like "all-natural," "natural-tasting," "lite" or "low-calorie." Whole foods don't need a marketing campaign; they're healthy, and you know it.

3. Check the expiration date: If the product doesn't expire until next year and is from a land far, far away, it is likely chock full of nasty preservatives. If it doesn't expire on the shelf for months and months, what makes you think your stomach will easily digest it?

The first step is always the hardest because it takes a few weeks for your body to get used to the new way of eating, and many people have withdraws and cravings in the beginning. Instead of focusing on the food, focus on your positivity and health, and keep smiling. After four weeks of eating healthy, you will become happier and more energized. In twelve weeks, your family and friends will notice the difference and need to know your secret.

You are what you eat. Sound off…

By: Brett Hoebel

Orginal Article: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/essential-tips-eating-healthy-budget-article-1.1528712